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  1. Marriage - Bemidbar/Shavuot DT

    Shabbat Bemidbar usually falls near Shavuot: the day designated as the anniversary of the revelation of Torah at Mt. Sinai. According to a midrash Shavuot is like the wedding anniversary of God and the Jewish people. In Exodus as the revelation unfolds, the position of the Israelites is described with a phrase: בְּתַחְתִּ֥ית הָהָֽר/betakhtit ha-har, which figuratively means “at the base of the mountain” but literally means “under the mountain”. To explain this the rabbis said that Mount Sinai was held over the Israelites like a wedding huppah.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/covenant-marriage

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 12:53pm

  2. Peoplehood Educational Gifts from Kaplan Center

    Rabbi Jeffrey Schein has created a suite of educational resources on Jewish peoplehood, under the auspices of the Kaplan Center for Jewish Peoplehood.

     

    The resources include:

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/video/jewish-peoplehood-educational-resources

    Posted on: 2016/06/28 - 10:41am

  3. On Torah & Wilderness - shavuot study sheet

    Study sheet on the significance of having received the Torah at Mt. Sinai, in the wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/torah-wilderness

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 5:53pm

  4. Broken Tablets text study

    A study sheet on the two sets of tablets in the Sinai/Golden Calf story. Prepared by Rabbi Sharon Stiefel for Shavuot study at Congregation Mayim Rabim

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/broken-tablets

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 9:34pm

  5. Shavuot: The Harvest Festival of Torah

    A good case can be made for Shavuot being the most important of all the Jewish festivals. The revival of its observance is of particular concern to Reconstructionist Jews because our understanding of the nature and task of the Jewish people in the world and of what God should mean to us cannot be separated from our reinterpretation of the meaning of Torah. Shavuot is the festival of the giving and the receiving of Torah — of Torah as revelation, as law and as study. The word “Torah” means teaching, guidance, instruction, orientation.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/shavuot-harvest-festival-torah

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 2:33pm

  6. Ruth, the First Convert (DT Shavuot)

    We soon celebrate Shavuot, called in our tradition “zman matan Torataynu,” the season of the giving of our Torah. It is a pleasant coincidence that the Torah reading for the Shabbat immediately preceding Shavuot is usually ”BaMidbar” (“In the wilderness”). Rabbinic tradition asserts that the Torah was given in the wilderness to demonstrate that it was not the property of a landed tribe but rather was available to anyone who chose to claim it as theirs.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/ruth-first-convert-model-welcome

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 2:42pm

  7. Shavuot DT SCR

    Revelation is a tricky thing. For Moses it took place at age 80 while standing in front of a burning bush. For Abraham it was in Haran at age 75 when he heard the voice of God telling him to take a different path from his ancestors and become a blessing to all the families of the world. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/revelation-gift

    Posted on: 2017/05/26 - 11:56am

  8. Ruth and Lovingkindess Teaching Session Gedzelman

    As we look forward to reading the Book of Ruth on the holiday of Shavuot, Rabbi David Gedzelman explores the text with an eye towards literary elements which speak of how the Hebrew Bible pushes forward structures of covenantal openness, societal protection and compassion towards the other built on and transcending the requirements of the Law. 

    The handout for the study session is available here:

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/book-ruth-torah-lovingkindness-face-death

    Posted on: 2017/05/26 - 2:05pm