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  1. Exodus in Our Time

    (This piece originally appeared in Reconstructionism Today.)

    Exodus in Our Time:
    A Story for the Children, Especially for Those
    Who Will Begin Their Journeys Soon

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/exodus-our-time

    Posted on: 2016/04/21 - 1:21pm

  2. Next Year in Jerusalem?

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem

    Posted on: 2016/04/25 - 2:47pm

  3. Recon Torah April 2015

    In this season of curiosity, I have been asking non-Jewish friends and acquaintances who are members of Jewish communities and families about their Jewish practice. The answers have been amazing and often surprising. One non-Jewish friend told me that, lately, she has been finding the act of reciting the shema to be particularly powerful.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/my-questions-pesach-season

    Posted on: 2015/04/09 - 12:00am

  4. Making Pesakh Personal study sheet

    This study sheet provides a variety of sources on the spiritual practices surrounding Passover (Pesakh).

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/making-pesakh-personal

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 5:33pm

  5. The Midwives of Exodus Text Study

    The following is an easily-accessible text study about the ethnic ambiguity that the Torah presents us with regarding the midwives who refused to obey Pharaoh's orders. (Exodus, Chapter 1). 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/midwives-exodus-interfaith-text-study

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 1:58pm

  6. Seder Blessing for Diverse Backgrounds

    The following blessing was originally written by Rabbi Maurice Harris for Interfaithfamily.com

    In the Book of Exodus, we read that when the Hebrew slaves were finally able to break free from Pharaoh’s grasp, a mixed multitude of people fled Egypt with them. From our first moments as a nation, we discovered among us a mixed multitude of slaves and refugees, people of different languages and beliefs, journeying with us into the unknown wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/passover-blessing-people-many-backgrounds-who-journey-us

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 2:06pm

  7. Twelve Years A Slave Passover Resource

    This printable resource pairs selected quotes from Solomon Northup’s autobiographical memoir, 12 Years a Slave, with quotes from the Exodus and other Jewish texts. It could be used as source material for divrei torah; as an adult education or religious school resource (probably for middle school and up); or as a Haggadah insert for community or Hillel seders or to individual home seders. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/twelve-years-slave-passover-resource

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 2:11pm

  8. Beshallah text study - at the sea

    This selection of midrashim on the crossing of the Red Sea provides a window into the tradition’s ethical concerns surrounding this well-known story. The texts may be read below, or downloaded in PDF form.

     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/sea-selection-midrashim

    Posted on: 2016/12/01 - 1:30pm

  9. Bronstein teaching call - Hasidic lens on Parashat Bo

    Today I want to share with you some of what I think are the most astounding, and provocative, and informative Jewish messages that we have available to us as Reconstructionists, as Jews in general today. But they come from a place that you might never think to look: the 18th-century and 19th-century Hasidic commentaries on the Torah.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/hasidic-lens-parashat-bo

    Posted on: 2016/12/01 - 5:11pm

  10. Next Year In Jerusalem

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem-0

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 2:39pm

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