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  1. Lecha Dodi Sheet Music

    This new setting of the traditional text for Lecha Dodi is by Elaine Moses. The lead sheet contains vocal line and guitar chords. Words for the first verse are included.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/lecha-dodi-sheet-music

    Posted on: 2016/04/14 - 10:48am

  2. Prayer for AIDS Awareness Shabbat

    Before Lighting the Shabbat Candles:

    Tonight, on AIDS Awareness Shabbat, we kindle these lights. Not only do these lights signify the beginning of Shabbat they symbolize much more. Tonight these lights represent the memories that continue to shine of those whom we have lost to the AIDS epidemic. Tonight these lights illuminate the path to wholeness and healing for all of us who are affected and infected by HIV/AIDS. Tonight these lights ignite the sparks within that call us to action. Tonight these lights are beacons of hope for an AIDS-free world.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/prayer-aids-awareness-shabbat

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 11:49am

  3. High Holiday Liturgy

    Rabbi Alan LaPayover (RRC ‘02), recorded the prayers of the Reconstructionist liturgy for the High Holiday services. The sound files are available for listening and download on this page of the RRC website.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/high-holiday-liturgy

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 1:19pm

  4. Oneg Shabbat Lesson

    This lesson, for use with Siddur Kol Ha’Noar, helps acquaint children and adults with the idea and practice of Shabbat.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/oneg-shabbat-delighting-shabbat-lesson-use-siddur-kol-hanoar

    Posted on: 2016/04/21 - 1:50pm

  5. Reconstructionist Torah Blessings

    The traditional blessing before reading from the Torah contains the phrase אֲשֶׁר בָּֽחַר בָּֽנוּ מִכָּל הָעַמִּים (asher bakhar banu mikol ha’amim) — “Praised are you Lord our God, ruler of the Universe, who has chosen us from among all peoples by giving us the Torah.”  The Reconstructionist version of that phrase is rewritten as אֲשֶׁר קֵרְבָנוּ לַעֲבוֹדָתוֹ (asher kervanu la’avodato), “who has drawn us to your service by giving us the Torah.” This change preserves the notion of Torah as our unique and prec

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/video/reconstructionist-blessing-torah-reading

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 5:06pm

  6. Yizkor Prayer for Righteous Gentiles

    In the early part of 1939, my father, mother and infant brother were living in Paris, as refugees from the pogroms in Romania. They were illegal immigrants, living modestly with the hope of giving themselves and their son a better future than the one they had. But World War II was approaching, and the citizens of France were in danger of falling prey to the Vichy regime that was collaborating with Germany and Hitler. As Jews and illegal residents, my parents were in an extremely precarious situation. They were poor and had no connections or reasonable way of changing their situation.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/yizkor-prayer-righteous-gentiles

    Posted on: 2016/09/29 - 12:45pm

  7. Resources Following Presidential Election

    Prayers and resources for discussion following the November 2016 Presidential election in the United States.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/resources-following-election

    Posted on: 2016/11/11 - 12:08pm

  8. God in Metaphor

    For many people, attending High Holydays services is a bit like going to a play where you really don't like the main character—where, much of the time, you doubt the very existence of the main character! If the “main character” in our traditional High Holydays liturgy is God, this can be quite a problem for anyone seeking a meaningful spiritual experience.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/god-metaphor-guide-perplexed

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 3:25pm

  9. Seder Blessing for Diverse Backgrounds

    The following blessing was originally written by Rabbi Maurice Harris for Interfaithfamily.com

    In the Book of Exodus, we read that when the Hebrew slaves were finally able to break free from Pharaoh’s grasp, a mixed multitude of people fled Egypt with them. From our first moments as a nation, we discovered among us a mixed multitude of slaves and refugees, people of different languages and beliefs, journeying with us into the unknown wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/passover-blessing-people-many-backgrounds-who-journey-us

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 2:06pm

  10. Yigdal Reconstructionist Text Study

    Yigdal, one of the most beloved of the medieval piyyutim (liturgical poems), appears as an opening hymn in the daily morning service. Yigdal summarizes the thirteen principles of the Jewish faith as formulated by Moses Maimonides (RaMBaM; late 12th century C.E.) in his Mishnah commentary on Sanhedrin 10:1.
     
    Reconstructionists often proudly assert that when we pray with a Reconstructionist siddur, we feel that we can 'say what we mean and mean what we say,' because our liturgical language reflects Reconstructionist theology.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/yigdal-reconstructionist-examination

    Posted on: 2016/11/30 - 2:00pm

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