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  1. Israel Lights in Darkness

    Since I’ve arrived in Israel, I’ve been hearing the phrase “during these dark days” as a preamble to any discussion of social and political issues. The atmosphere is tentative, and a bit heavy. Along with winter’s progression of light becoming dimmer and dimmer, the almost daily terrorist attacks emphasize a sense of helplessness and doom. Many Israelis feel paralyzed: not believing the situation can change, they also don’t think that there is anything they can personally do to change it.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/israeli-jewish-renaissance-lights-darkness

    Posted on: 2016/02/15 - 1:34pm

  2. Trees of the Bible

    There are many trees mentioned in the Bible. Here is a list of some of them and where you can find them. Look them up and find out what they say about them.

    Acacia: Exodus 26:15
    Almond: Numbers 17:8; Ecclesiastes 12:5
    Apple: Joel 1:12; Song of Songs 2:2-5
    Cedar: I Kings 9:11; II Chronicles 2:3-8
    Cypress: Isaiah 41:19; I Kings 9:11
    Date Palm: Psalms 92:12-14
    Fig: Song of Songs 2:11-13
    Henna: Song of Songs 1:14

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/trees-bible

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 1:52pm

  3. Guide to Talking about Israel in your Congregation

  4. A Version of Israel's Secular Shabbat -- Via a Song

    The song below, Shabbat Ba’boker can be found on Arik Einstein and Yoni Richter’s CD , “When I Was a Kid.” It is a Shabbat song with no reference to ritual or practice. In a way that only an Israeli song can express, it communicates a deep sense of how joyous Sabbath can be. It is upbeat and jazzy.

    Shabbat Morning
    words by Tirtzah Atar

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/version-israels-secular-shabbat-song

    Posted on: 2016/04/21 - 12:42pm

  5. Next Year in Jerusalem?

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem

    Posted on: 2016/04/25 - 2:47pm

  6. Parsing the Meeting of Jacob and Esau

    Torah:

    Jacob is leaving Haran after 20 years. He left originally out of fear that Esau might kill him in revenge for Jacob having tricked Isaac into giving him the blessing. He is on his way back to Canaan when he becomes aware that Esau is approaching him in a large group:

    The messengers returned to Jacob and said, “We came to your brother Esau. He is also approaching you. He has 400 people with him.” Jacob feared greatly and was distressed.(Genesis 32:6-7)

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/parsing-meeting-jacob-and-esau

    Posted on: 2016/04/25 - 4:13pm

  7. A History of Reconstructionist Zionism

    In preparing this essay, I had the opportunity to read books, editorials and articles from an 80-year span of Reconstructionist history.[1] This wide-ranging array of material reflects a striking uniformity in Reconstructionist positions on Zionism. From the movement’s outset, every intellectual leader has been a committed Zionist loyal to the same principles. Their responses to changing political situations have been quite predictable based on their earlier positions.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/history-reconstructionist-zionism

    Posted on: 2016/05/04 - 2:27pm

  8. On Occupied Ground

    “It’s the occupation, stupid.”

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/occupied-ground

    Posted on: 2016/05/04 - 2:30pm

  9. Finding a New Narrative

    One of my favorite book titles, by writer and political activist Jim Hightower, is There's Nothing in the Middle of the Road but Yellow Stripes and Dead Armadillos. This is a credo to which I generally adhere. I prefer a principled ideological stance based clearly on one's values and analysis of the given situation than a nebulous striving to find “the center.” As it turns out, my values and analysis usually put me squarely in the progressive camp on most political issues.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/finding-new-narrative

    Posted on: 2016/05/04 - 2:31pm

  10. Values, Middle East Politics and the Future of Israel

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