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  1. Prayer for AIDS Awareness Shabbat

    Before Lighting the Shabbat Candles:

    Tonight, on AIDS Awareness Shabbat, we kindle these lights. Not only do these lights signify the beginning of Shabbat they symbolize much more. Tonight these lights represent the memories that continue to shine of those whom we have lost to the AIDS epidemic. Tonight these lights illuminate the path to wholeness and healing for all of us who are affected and infected by HIV/AIDS. Tonight these lights ignite the sparks within that call us to action. Tonight these lights are beacons of hope for an AIDS-free world.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/prayer-aids-awareness-shabbat

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 11:49am

  2. High Holiday Liturgy

    Rabbi Alan LaPayover (RRC ‘02), recorded the prayers of the Reconstructionist liturgy for the High Holiday services. The sound files are available for listening and download on this page of the RRC website.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/high-holiday-liturgy

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 1:19pm

  3. Reconstructionist Torah Blessings

    The traditional blessing before reading from the Torah contains the phrase אֲשֶׁר בָּֽחַר בָּֽנוּ מִכָּל הָעַמִּים (asher bakhar banu mikol ha’amim) — “Praised are you Lord our God, ruler of the Universe, who has chosen us from among all peoples by giving us the Torah.”  The Reconstructionist version of that phrase is rewritten as אֲשֶׁר קֵרְבָנוּ לַעֲבוֹדָתוֹ (asher kervanu la’avodato), “who has drawn us to your service by giving us the Torah.” This change preserves the notion of Torah as our unique and prec

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/video/reconstructionist-blessing-torah-reading

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 5:06pm

  4. Yizkor Prayer for Righteous Gentiles

    In the early part of 1939, my father, mother and infant brother were living in Paris, as refugees from the pogroms in Romania. They were illegal immigrants, living modestly with the hope of giving themselves and their son a better future than the one they had. But World War II was approaching, and the citizens of France were in danger of falling prey to the Vichy regime that was collaborating with Germany and Hitler. As Jews and illegal residents, my parents were in an extremely precarious situation. They were poor and had no connections or reasonable way of changing their situation.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/yizkor-prayer-righteous-gentiles

    Posted on: 2016/09/29 - 12:45pm

  5. God in Metaphor

    For many people, attending High Holydays services is a bit like going to a play where you really don't like the main character—where, much of the time, you doubt the very existence of the main character! If the “main character” in our traditional High Holydays liturgy is God, this can be quite a problem for anyone seeking a meaningful spiritual experience.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/god-metaphor-guide-perplexed

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 3:25pm

  6. Seder Blessing for Diverse Backgrounds

    The following blessing was originally written by Rabbi Maurice Harris for Interfaithfamily.com

    In the Book of Exodus, we read that when the Hebrew slaves were finally able to break free from Pharaoh’s grasp, a mixed multitude of people fled Egypt with them. From our first moments as a nation, we discovered among us a mixed multitude of slaves and refugees, people of different languages and beliefs, journeying with us into the unknown wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/passover-blessing-people-many-backgrounds-who-journey-us

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 2:06pm

  7. Next Year In Jerusalem

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem-0

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 2:39pm

  8. Fuller Aleynu For Siddur Kol Ha'Noar

    Siddur Kol Hano'ar uses a truncated version of the Aleynu prayer. This fuller version uses Reconstructionist wording and can be pasted into Siddur Kol Hano'ar. It is available with and without transliteration.

    Print the pdfs onto labels and cut them to size. Peel off the backs and paste the labels onto pages 34 and 82.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/fuller-aleynu-siddur-kol-hanoar

    Posted on: 2017/04/25 - 3:06pm

  9. The observance of Tisha B'Av

    This article is excerpted from The Guide to Jewish Practice, Volume 2. The full Guide may be ordered from the Reconstructionist Press.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/observance-tisha-bav

    Posted on: 2017/07/27 - 5:48pm

  10. Brant Rosen psalm 79

    can you pour out your love
    upon the ones you do not know,
    the ones who mutter their strange
    and fearful prayers, who
    refuse to call upon god
    by your comfortable, familiar names?

    can you tear open your robe and
    let your compassion bleed out,
    swaddling and comforting
    those you have been taught to fear
    with an indignation that burns
    like a devouring fire?

    are you ready to mourn
    the dead of another family
    whose blood is your blood,
    the one who looks like a stranger
    but is, in truth,
    your own flesh and kin?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/psalm-79-pour-out-your-love

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 5:12pm

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