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  1. High Holiday Liturgy

    Rabbi Alan LaPayover (RRC ‘02), recorded the prayers of the Reconstructionist liturgy for the High Holiday services. The sound files are available for listening and download on this page of the RRC website.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/high-holiday-liturgy

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 1:19pm

  2. Living the Mission: Values-Based Decision-Making and Reconstructing Judaism

    Ben Weiner knows how to pray.

    Raised in an Orthodox home, the 68-year-old former president of Temple Emmanuel in Wakefield, Massachusetts, has been an active synagogue-goer nearly his whole life. He’d long recited much of the service by heart, uttering Hebrew prayers for the coming of the messiah, the resurrection of the dead and thanked God for choosing the Jews to receive the Torah. Yet he’d never really delved into the meaning of the words or examined the extent to which they reflected his own beliefs.

    Until now.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/news/exploring-liturgy-temple-emmanuel

    Posted on: 2018/03/06 - 10:50am

  3. Shofar Kavannah for Refugees

    This ritual invokes the blast of the shofar to articulate the plight of refugees. It was created for use at High Holidays in response to the presidential travel ban.

    The blasts of the shofar are a wordless prayer punctuated by moments of silence. The stories of courage, hope, and determination of refugees resettling in our communities are punctuated by the silent yearnings of those who are kept out by the presidential travel ban.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/shofar-kavannah-refugees

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 3:35pm

  4. Psalm 27 Interpretation

    לְדָוִ֨ד ׀ יְהוָ֤ה ׀ אוֹרִ֣י וְ֭יִשְׁעִי מִמִּ֣י אִירָ֑א יְהוָ֥ה מָֽעוֹז־חַ֝יַּ֗י מִמִּ֥י אֶפְחָֽד׃

    Awareness is sunlight in the mind. No one can take that from me. Awareness is my life’s stronghold. It absorbs all fear.

    בִּקְרֹ֤ב עָלַ֨י ׀ מְרֵעִים֮ לֶאֱכֹ֪ל אֶת־בְּשָׂ֫רִ֥י צָרַ֣י וְאֹיְבַ֣י לִ֑י הֵ֖מָּה כָשְׁל֣וּ וְנָפָֽלוּ׃

    The hindrances and defilements are as close as my flesh and mind, but they dissolve in the light of being known.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/psalm-27

    Posted on: 2017/08/18 - 12:21am

  5. Brant Rosen psalm 79

    can you pour out your love
    upon the ones you do not know,
    the ones who mutter their strange
    and fearful prayers, who
    refuse to call upon god
    by your comfortable, familiar names?

    can you tear open your robe and
    let your compassion bleed out,
    swaddling and comforting
    those you have been taught to fear
    with an indignation that burns
    like a devouring fire?

    are you ready to mourn
    the dead of another family
    whose blood is your blood,
    the one who looks like a stranger
    but is, in truth,
    your own flesh and kin?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/psalm-79-pour-out-your-love

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 5:12pm

  6. Amidah for Peace, Justice, and Immigration

    This alternative Amidah was used during mincha prayers by members of the Reconstructionist Rabbinic Association outside of an Immigration Processing Center in order to call attention to the plight of immigrants and underscore the importance of the Jewish obligation to welcome the stranger. It is meant to be done as a call and response.

    Avot

    God of our ancestors. God of immigrants. God of refugees. We are border crossers.
    We tie our fate with You who cannot be contained by customs offices. You who requires no passport

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/amidah-peace-justice-and-immigration

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 5:16pm

  7. Seder Blessing for Diverse Backgrounds

    The following blessing was originally written by Rabbi Maurice Harris for Interfaithfamily.com

    In the Book of Exodus, we read that when the Hebrew slaves were finally able to break free from Pharaoh’s grasp, a mixed multitude of people fled Egypt with them. From our first moments as a nation, we discovered among us a mixed multitude of slaves and refugees, people of different languages and beliefs, journeying with us into the unknown wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/passover-blessing-people-many-backgrounds-who-journey-us

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 2:06pm

  8. Yizkor Prayer for Righteous Gentiles

    In the early part of 1939, my father, mother and infant brother were living in Paris, as refugees from the pogroms in Romania. They were illegal immigrants, living modestly with the hope of giving themselves and their son a better future than the one they had. But World War II was approaching, and the citizens of France were in danger of falling prey to the Vichy regime that was collaborating with Germany and Hitler. As Jews and illegal residents, my parents were in an extremely precarious situation. They were poor and had no connections or reasonable way of changing their situation.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/yizkor-prayer-righteous-gentiles

    Posted on: 2016/09/29 - 12:45pm

  9. Hashkiveinu, Prayer and Connection

    This lesson helps children and adults delve into the meaning and feeling of the Hashkiveinu prayer. It uses a story and other texts from Siddur Kol Hano'ar to make students more comfortable with the siddur.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/hashkiveinu-prayer-and-connection-lesson-use-siddur-kol-hanoar

    Posted on: 2017/04/25 - 3:17pm

  10. Kol HaNeshamah Hebrew in Davkawriter format

    This .zip file contains four documents with the Hebrew text of the services found in the Kol Haneshamah: Shabbat Vehagim prayer book.

    Note: you must have the Davkawriter Hebrew word processor installed on your computer to view these documents. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/kol-haneshamah-hebrew-text-davkawriter-format

    Posted on: 2017/04/25 - 3:12pm

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