fbpx Site Search | Page 17 | Reconstructing Judaism

The search found 336 results in 0.048 seconds.

Search results

  1. Shavuot: The Harvest Festival of Torah

    A good case can be made for Shavuot being the most important of all the Jewish festivals. The revival of its observance is of particular concern to Reconstructionist Jews because our understanding of the nature and task of the Jewish people in the world and of what God should mean to us cannot be separated from our reinterpretation of the meaning of Torah. Shavuot is the festival of the giving and the receiving of Torah — of Torah as revelation, as law and as study. The word “Torah” means teaching, guidance, instruction, orientation.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/shavuot-harvest-festival-torah

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 2:33pm

  2. Ruth, the First Convert (DT Shavuot)

    We soon celebrate Shavuot, called in our tradition “zman matan Torataynu,” the season of the giving of our Torah. It is a pleasant coincidence that the Torah reading for the Shabbat immediately preceding Shavuot is usually ”BaMidbar” (“In the wilderness”). Rabbinic tradition asserts that the Torah was given in the wilderness to demonstrate that it was not the property of a landed tribe but rather was available to anyone who chose to claim it as theirs.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/ruth-first-convert-model-welcome

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 2:42pm

  3. The Hebrew Word For Patience

    “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore,” the Peter Finch character screams in the movie Network, one of the more memorable moments in cinematic history. In contemporary U.S. culture, it often seems as if speaking your mind, no matter how hurtful, and no matter what the consequences, is considered a virtue. That’s a problem!

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/hebrew-word-patience

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 3:22pm

  4. Pregnant in Israel

    The belly of a pregnant woman is public property. Traditional Jewish law divides domains into public (reshut harabim) and private (reshut hayahid), much like American law. While there is probably no case establishing this in the She’elot U’tshuvot (body of law known as the Responsa Literature containing questions asked of authoritative rabbis), the general public in Israel has indeed ruled that my belly, like the bellies of all pregnant women, belongs to the reshut harabim.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/pregnant-israel

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 3:37pm

  5. Looking Backward and Looking Forward: Texts for a Jewish Resistance Movement

    These materials were created by Rabbi Lauren Grabelle Herrmann of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism for the January 2017 Day of Reconstructionist Learning in New York. A writeup of the day’s teaching can be found here.

    Rabbi Herrmann also provided teaching notes for her session, which can be found here:

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/looking-backward-and-looking-forward-texts-jewish-resistance-movement

    Posted on: 2017/02/03 - 2:07pm

  6. A Discussion About Teaching Hanukkah: Miracle or Not?

    Discussion from November 2004


    Toni Bloomberg Grossman, Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation, Bethesda, MD

    Hi everyone,

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/discussion-about-teaching-hanukkah-miracle-or-not

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 2:31pm

  7. Next Year In Jerusalem

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem-0

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 2:39pm

  8. If God Is Good, Why Do Pain and Suffering Exist?

  9. Love, Enemies and Evil: Beshalakh Text Study

      In this text study for Parashat Beshalakh, Rabbi Toba Spitzer examines the fate of the Egyptians at the Red Sea and our tradition's ethical sensitivity to their plight.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/love-enemies-and-evil-beshalakh-text-study

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 4:21pm

  10. Vision Statement - DW

    Rabbi Deborah Waxman shares her vision for the Reconstructionist movement upon the occasion of her inauguration.

    Why Reconstructionism now?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/vision-statement

    Posted on: 2014/11/03 - 12:00am

Pages