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  1. The Nazirite - DT Naso

    Jewish tradition teaches that the Torah yields 613 commandments, which are incumbent on the Jewish people. One would think that this daunting total would be sufficient for most Jews, yet this week's Torah portion, Naso, teaches of additional regulations which one could assume under the status of being a “Nazirite”, one consecrated to the service of God. The haftara (additional) reading for this Shabbat narrates the story of Sampson, who according to the Bible was himself a Nazirite. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/nazirite

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 11:29am

  2. Marriage - Bemidbar/Shavuot DT

    Shabbat Bemidbar usually falls near Shavuot: the day designated as the anniversary of the revelation of Torah at Mt. Sinai. According to a midrash Shavuot is like the wedding anniversary of God and the Jewish people. In Exodus as the revelation unfolds, the position of the Israelites is described with a phrase: בְּתַחְתִּ֥ית הָהָֽר/betakhtit ha-har, which figuratively means “at the base of the mountain” but literally means “under the mountain”. To explain this the rabbis said that Mount Sinai was held over the Israelites like a wedding huppah.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/covenant-marriage

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 12:53pm

  3. Nachshon - Jump vs. Pushed DT Bemidbar

    At first glance this week's parashah, Bemidbar, seems rather tedious. After all, it consists mainly of the names of the heads of all the tribes, given in the context of a census of the Israelites taking place about a year after the events at Mount Sinai. However, one name in the census jumped out at me: Nachshon ben Aminadav, the head of the tribe of Judah. Nachshon is a very famous character in the Midrash even though he is barely mentioned in the Torah.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/nachshon-did-he-jump-or-was-he-pushed

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 1:07pm

  4. Blessings and Curses DT Behukotai

    At the end of the traditional Birkat HaMazon, the Grace after the Meal, is a verse from the Book of Psalms that reads, “Once I was young and now I have grown old but I have never seen a righteous person abandoned nor his children begging for food” (Psalm 37:25). It is one of a series of biblical verses acknowledging God as the one who sustains all. There are many ways to sing the verse but I was taught to drop my voice when I came to this passage and recite it in a whisper. Why?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/blessings-and-curses

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 1:12pm

  5. Land DT Behar

    Parashat Behar is primarily concerned with rules and regulations pertaining to the land of Israel. We read the description of the laws governing the sabbatical (“Shmitta”) years in which the land was to lie fallow one out of every seven years. We learn of the idea of the Jubilee year, which occurred every fifty years, when property that had passed out of a family by reason of economic necessity reverted to the original owners.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/land

    Posted on: 2016/06/16 - 1:27pm

  6. Raising Future Decision Makers - SCR community learning

    Rabbi Steven Carr Reuben, Ph.D. is a nationally recognized expert in the field of moral education and has written extensively on that topic. In this recording of a community teaching call, he discusses raising ethical children of character and share ten keys to leading your children to ethical choices in everyday life:

     

    CHILDREN OF CHARACTER:  Leading Your Children to Ethical Choices in Everyday Life

     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/raising-future-decision-makers-ten-keys-ethical-choices-everyday-life

    Posted on: 2016/07/01 - 12:25pm

  7. Learn main landing page

    What is Reconstructionist Judaism? How do Reconstructionist Jews approach questions of ethics and decision making? How do Reconstructionists understand religious experience and spirituality? What does Reconstructionist Torah study look like? Explore the Learn section of our site to delve into these questions and many more.

     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/learn

    Posted on: 2016/07/20 - 11:31am

  8. Act main landing page

    For Reconstructionists, Judaism is not just a philosophy. Lived Jewish experience is at the core of Jewish peoplehood. Reconstructionists learn from traditional practice, adapting it to our era, so that we can:

    • Mark important moments in our lives

    • Create and share creative works of beauty and insight

    • Mark important moments in our lives

    • Imbue each week, and the seasons of each year, with meaning and consciousness

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/act

    Posted on: 2016/07/20 - 11:32am

  9. Connect main landing / Newsletter Archive

    Reconstructionist communities pray, learn, celebrate, and take action together. In our congregations, havurot and camp, we take bold risks and firm stands in order to help Torah, Jewish practice, culture and community evolve to meet the needs of today’s diverse progressive Jews and fellow travellers. Rooted in Jewish values, we work across boundaries in the service of justice, peace, and global well-being.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/connect

    Posted on: 2016/07/20 - 11:32am

  10. Reconstructionism Landing

    Reconstructionists approach Judaism — and life — with deep reverence for the past and a passion to relate it to the present. In a rapidly changing world, Reconstructionist communities share and create new ways of being Jewish to connect us to the divine and ensure our lives are filled with purpose.

    • We view Judaism as the evolving civilization of the Jewish people in an ongoing relationship with God. Our shared culture — rituals, traditions and practices — reflect over 3,000 years of that evolution, and we continue to share and shape it today.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/learn/reconstructionism

    Posted on: 2016/08/22 - 12:43am

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