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  1. Hagar: The Immigrant Worker

    Many, many years ago in a distant land a woman named Sarah was married to Abraham. Sarah was not able to bear children. She was distressed and often wondered how she could increase her standing in the community and keep the wealth she and her husband had acquired in their family, both of which depended on having children. One day she realized the answer was right there before her eyes in the form of her domestic help, the young immigrant woman from Egypt named Hagar. Sarah knew that Hagar needed the job at her house and would do whatever it took to keep it.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/sermon/hagar-immigrant-worker

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 4:06pm

  2. Addressing Race as a Jewish Community

    Yom Kippur is a time when we confess our wrongdoings collectively, and is therefore an opportune moment in the Jewish calendar to reflect on how we can do teshuvah for the ways in which we have failed, communally and individually, to address the issue of racism.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/sermon/addressing-race-jewish-community

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 3:08pm

  3. Hagar the Stranger

    Turn it and turn it, for everything is in it, Ben Bag Bag taught about studying the Torah. Reflect on it, pore over it, grow old and gray with it, for there is no better reward than this. Well, I’m not gray yet, but I sure am getting older, and bald already happened. And with age maybe I’m starting to repeat myself more, but I’ll tell you again: Ben Bag Bag, the ancient sage with the best alliterative name, was a wise man. The Torah continues to reveal its deep wisdom to me, and ever-greater connecting patterns of meaning unfold before me.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/sermon/hagar-stranger

    Posted on: 2017/08/17 - 3:38pm

  4. High Holiday Message 5778 (2017)

    At Rosh Hashanah, as we turn to new beginnings, we seek to repent—to do teshuvah—for what we have done wrong. And we can also affirmatively foster ourselves toward resilience—toward a thriving, loving outlook in spite of whatever challenges we encounter in life. In this video, I explore themes of resilience embedded into Jewish practice.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/video/high-holiday-message-5778

    Posted on: 2017/09/19 - 12:11pm

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