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  1. Ariana Katz Launch

  2. Book Club Third Session 11/27/17

    What is my “Elijah moment?” How do I take care of myself, take care of the people I work with, and continue my activism? 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/bookclubthirdsession

    Posted on: 2017/11/28 - 2:46pm

  3. Embracing the Stranger - Internal

    Embracing the stranger is an endeavor that requires not just outward action, but internal effort on many levels. Both as individuals and communities, real inclusion involves rethinking of boundaries.

    Click here to return to the main “Embracing the Stranger” page)

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/collection/looking-within

    Posted on: 2017/08/18 - 1:06pm

  4. Embracing the Stranger - Justice and Wider World

    Embracing the stranger is not just an individual journey—it’s a communal calling. We are commanded as Jews to “Love the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt.” (Deuteronomy 10:19) In the face of fear, hostility, or simple disregard toward those who are different, our challenge is to lift up our common humanity, and our inherent dignity and worth as beings b’tzelem Elohim, reflecting the divine image.

    Click here to return to the main “Embracing the Stranger” page)

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/collection/wider-world

    Posted on: 2017/08/18 - 12:46pm

  5. A Stranger in Two Communities

    Perhaps, for some people, the decision to convert to Judaism comes in a Road-to-Damascus moment (to mix religious metaphors)—all of a sudden, you know that you want to be a Jew. That was not what happened in my life.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/stranger-two-communities-second-generation-american-and-jewish-convert

    Posted on: 2017/08/18 - 12:23pm

  6. Reconstructing Yiddishkeit

    Among recent attempts to define “Jewish authenticity,” I find one characterization of its absence most intriguing. In an essay titled “The Imaginary Jew” that appeared in The Nation three years ago, literary critic William Deresiewicz analyzed the failure of contemporary Jewish fiction to produce hard-nosed explorations of the present, and noted its tendency to rely instead on whimsical exoticism. This, he claimed, could be contextualized as part of a larger social trend.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/reconstructing-yiddishkeit

    Posted on: 2016/05/13 - 1:05pm

  7. Ruth, the First Convert (DT Shavuot)

    We soon celebrate Shavuot, called in our tradition “zman matan Torataynu,” the season of the giving of our Torah. It is a pleasant coincidence that the Torah reading for the Shabbat immediately preceding Shavuot is usually ”BaMidbar” (“In the wilderness”). Rabbinic tradition asserts that the Torah was given in the wilderness to demonstrate that it was not the property of a landed tribe but rather was available to anyone who chose to claim it as theirs.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/ruth-first-convert-model-welcome

    Posted on: 2017/01/31 - 2:42pm

  8. Educating Future Jews: Jewish-Americans or American Jews?

    Should children receiving conflicting, non-Jewish, religious education be allowed to enroll in a synagogue school?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/educating-future-jews-jewish-americans-or-american-jews

    Posted on: 2017/03/29 - 10:34am

  9. Zionism and Communal Covenant

    In 2004, the JRF Israel Policies Task Force issued a report calling for a recommitment to Zionism. This excerpt from that report explores Kaplan's definition of “New Zionism.” It also discusses how a communal covenant could strengthen the relationships among the Reconstructionist community, Israel and the broader Jewish community.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/zionism-and-communal-covenant-reconstructionist-approach

    Posted on: 2016/05/05 - 2:47pm

  10. Next Year in Jerusalem?

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem

    Posted on: 2016/04/25 - 2:47pm

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