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  1. Fuller Aleynu For Siddur Kol Ha'Noar

    Siddur Kol Hano'ar uses a truncated version of the Aleynu prayer. This fuller version uses Reconstructionist wording and can be pasted into Siddur Kol Hano'ar. It is available with and without transliteration.

    Print the pdfs onto labels and cut them to size. Peel off the backs and paste the labels onto pages 34 and 82.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/fuller-aleynu-siddur-kol-hanoar

    Posted on: 2017/04/25 - 3:06pm

  2. Passover Kiddush

    This track contains the Reconstructionist text of the Kiddush prayer for the Passover seder. It was recorded by Shabbat Unplugged, whose members are:

    The recording comes from the companion CD to the Reconstructionist Haggadah, A Night of Questions.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/music/kiddush-passover

    Posted on: 2017/04/05 - 2:45pm

  3. Reconstructionist Radio: The Passover Seder

    This audio program, recorded in 1998, offers an overview of the structure, development and religious meanings of the haggadah and the Passover seder with Rabbis Joy Levitt and Richard Hirsh. It includes a special behind-the-scenes look at the Reconstructionist haggadah, A Night of Questions, and its accompanying music CD. This is an episode of Heart, Mind and Spirit: Reconstructionist Radio hosted by Rabbi Shawn Zevit. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/reconstructionist-radio-passover-seder

    Posted on: 2017/04/05 - 4:18pm

  4. Making Seder and Kiddush more inclusive

    One of the small but significant innovations of the Reconstructionist haggadah, “A Night of Questions,” was the rubric “wine or grape juice” that appears before each of the traditional four cups of the Seder as well as in the Introduction of how to prepare for Pesach.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/making-seder-and-kiddush-more-inclusive

    Posted on: 2016/04/18 - 3:51pm

  5. Liturgy and Prayer PEARL session 2010

    When we worship in public we know our life is part of a larger life, a wave of an ocean of being- the first-hand experience of that larger life which is God.”

    Mordecai Kaplan

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/liturgy-and-prayer-leadership-distance-learning-session

    Posted on: 2017/01/30 - 4:22pm

  6. Next Year In Jerusalem

    Different Meanings

    Each year, around seder tables throughout the world, Jews and our guests end the haggadah with the phrase, “L'shanah haba'ah biyerushalayim — Next Year in Jerusalem.” Like the four children who appear earlier in the haggadah text as paradigms for the ways Jews approach the historical narrative, those who say or hear “Next Year in Jerusalem” do so with many different degrees of self-knowledge or awareness in relationship to the phrase.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/next-year-jerusalem-0

    Posted on: 2017/02/10 - 2:39pm

  7. God in Metaphor

    For many people, attending High Holydays services is a bit like going to a play where you really don't like the main character—where, much of the time, you doubt the very existence of the main character! If the “main character” in our traditional High Holydays liturgy is God, this can be quite a problem for anyone seeking a meaningful spiritual experience.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/god-metaphor-guide-perplexed

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 3:25pm

  8. Yigdal Reconstructionist Text Study

    Yigdal, one of the most beloved of the medieval piyyutim (liturgical poems), appears as an opening hymn in the daily morning service. Yigdal summarizes the thirteen principles of the Jewish faith as formulated by Moses Maimonides (RaMBaM; late 12th century C.E.) in his Mishnah commentary on Sanhedrin 10:1.
     
    Reconstructionists often proudly assert that when we pray with a Reconstructionist siddur, we feel that we can 'say what we mean and mean what we say,' because our liturgical language reflects Reconstructionist theology.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/yigdal-reconstructionist-examination

    Posted on: 2016/11/30 - 2:00pm

  9. Prayer for the State of Israel

  10. Prayer for AIDS Awareness Shabbat

    Before Lighting the Shabbat Candles:

    Tonight, on AIDS Awareness Shabbat, we kindle these lights. Not only do these lights signify the beginning of Shabbat they symbolize much more. Tonight these lights represent the memories that continue to shine of those whom we have lost to the AIDS epidemic. Tonight these lights illuminate the path to wholeness and healing for all of us who are affected and infected by HIV/AIDS. Tonight these lights ignite the sparks within that call us to action. Tonight these lights are beacons of hope for an AIDS-free world.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/prayer-aids-awareness-shabbat

    Posted on: 2016/04/15 - 11:49am

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