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  1. Pacfic Northwest Shabbaton Writeup

    At the bucolic Camp Solomon Schechter outside Olympia, Wash., roughly 120 people, both adults and children, experienced Jewish community at its most inspiring. By joining together in a current climate where individuals have fallen away from communal activities and commitments—described by Robert D.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/news/pnw-shabbaton-2017

    Posted on: 2017/08/08 - 10:28am

  2. Statement on Charlottesville

    The Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and Jewish Reconstructionist Communities condemns in the strongest terms the white supremacist groups that gathered in Charlottesville, VA, over the weekend to promote racism, anti-Semitism, and other ideologies of bigotry. Our hearts go out to the family of Heather Heyer, the anti-hate demonstrator who was killed in what has been accurately characterized by the U.S.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/news/charlottesville-response

    Posted on: 2017/08/14 - 2:35pm

  3. Hashivenu op-ed

    This essay was originally published on August 15, 2017 at eJewishPhilanthropy.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/news/keeping-faith-resilience-jewish-tradition

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 9:50am

  4. AirBNB as a Spiritual Practice

    When our son officially moved out, Simcha, my husband, and I listed our house on AirBnB. Of course, we could use the extra income, but also we knew the house felt empty with both kids gone. We were already paying the utilities for the whole house AND were feeling somewhat guilty about the unused rooms…. Why not share our space? After all, hospitality is a Jewish value.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/welcoming-strangers-through-airbnb-spiritual-practice

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 3:51pm

  5. Brant Rosen psalm 79

    can you pour out your love
    upon the ones you do not know,
    the ones who mutter their strange
    and fearful prayers, who
    refuse to call upon god
    by your comfortable, familiar names?

    can you tear open your robe and
    let your compassion bleed out,
    swaddling and comforting
    those you have been taught to fear
    with an indignation that burns
    like a devouring fire?

    are you ready to mourn
    the dead of another family
    whose blood is your blood,
    the one who looks like a stranger
    but is, in truth,
    your own flesh and kin?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/psalm-79-pour-out-your-love

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 5:12pm

  6. Amidah for Peace, Justice, and Immigration

    This alternative Amidah was used during mincha prayers by members of the Reconstructionist Rabbinic Association outside of an Immigration Processing Center in order to call attention to the plight of immigrants and underscore the importance of the Jewish obligation to welcome the stranger. It is meant to be done as a call and response.

    Avot

    God of our ancestors. God of immigrants. God of refugees. We are border crossers.
    We tie our fate with You who cannot be contained by customs offices. You who requires no passport

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/amidah-peace-justice-and-immigration

    Posted on: 2017/08/15 - 5:16pm

  7. Responding to Disability - GKM Elul Project

    In my work as Director of Jewish Learning Venture’s Whole Community Inclusion, I have the wonderful opportunity of leading disability awareness trainings for educators, clergy, and community members across the Greater Philadelphia area.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/responding-disability

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 1:46pm

  8. I Want You to Know I Am Human: Listening to the Stranger Behind Bars

    I am a public defender. I have a client who thanks me, constantly. He thanks me for taking his calls, for answering his letters, for passing on bad news. On some days, his enthusiasm and gratitude buoy me. I hope he believes that I am fighting for him as well as any lawyer could. I hope he knows I hear him. On other days, I rail against my clients’ low expectations. Some of our clients do not expect competent lawyers, do not expect to be heard. They do not expect their lives to matter. More than anything, I cannot accept this.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/i-want-you-know-i-am-human-listening-stranger-behind-bars

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 2:56pm

  9. Desperate Immigrants: An Ancient Jewish Story

    In the Book of Genesis, we read about Abraham and Sarah’s journey to the Promised Land. Shortly after they arrive, they encounter famine and head to Egypt in search of food. Foreigners without family or clan to protect them, they are afraid. Abraham asks Sarah to pretend to be his sister in the hope that this will help them avoid trouble – an act of deceit that potentially offered them some protection from harm in the context of their times.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/desperate-immigrants-ancient-jewish-story

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 3:27pm

  10. Shofar Kavannah for Refugees

    This ritual invokes the blast of the shofar to articulate the plight of refugees. It was created for use at High Holidays in response to the presidential travel ban.

    The blasts of the shofar are a wordless prayer punctuated by moments of silence. The stories of courage, hope, and determination of refugees resettling in our communities are punctuated by the silent yearnings of those who are kept out by the presidential travel ban.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/shofar-kavannah-refugees

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 3:35pm

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