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  1. Network Landing: PJ Stories (2016-17)

    How can we make Jewish stories come to life?

    Facilitated by Lisa Litman, Director of PJ Goes to School; and Cyd Weissman, Assistant Vice President for Innovation and Impact at RRC

    For up to 20 educators, or parents of children in kindergarten through second grade

    Webinars are from 12 p.m.-1:15 p.m. EST. Attend one session for each gathering.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/networks/2016/pj-stories

    Posted on: 2016/11/02 - 4:39pm

  2. DT Naso Toba Spitzer

    (Originally published in Torah Queeries: Weekly Commentaries on the Hebrew Bible)

    A number of years ago, Pride Weekend in Boston fell on the Shabbat of Parshat Naso. Preparing my d’var Torah for Shabbat morning services that week, I wondered, what might this portion have to teach about GLBT pride?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/impurity-blessing

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 1:34pm

  3. Tazria Metzora Story - Gift of Impermanence

    “Orit!” “Ori-i-i-t!” Her mother was calling, but Orit was preoccupied. “Orit Rivkah bat Mushi!” shouted her mother—the use of her full name indicating a growing consternation. “Where are you?!”
     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/gift-impermanence-story-parashat-tazriametzora

    Posted on: 2016/11/29 - 3:35pm

  4. The Reconstructionist Revolution (PEARL call, Jane Litman)

    In this hour-long conference call, Rabbi Jane Litman presents an overview of the revolutionary ideas that underlie the first century of Reconstructionist Judaism.

    Selected quotes follow. The entire call transcript is available at the bottom of this page. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/reconstructionist-revolution-foundational-ideas

    Posted on: 2016/11/30 - 6:51pm

  5. Bronstein teaching call - Hasidic lens on Parashat Bo

    Today I want to share with you some of what I think are the most astounding, and provocative, and informative Jewish messages that we have available to us as Reconstructionists, as Jews in general today. But they come from a place that you might never think to look: the 18th-century and 19th-century Hasidic commentaries on the Torah.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/spoken-audio/hasidic-lens-parashat-bo

    Posted on: 2016/12/01 - 5:11pm

  6. Creative Expression Landing

    Reconstructionism views Judaism not just as a religion, but as a civilization. Art, literature, music, theater, dance—each of these expressions of creativity is an important facet of a rich, dynamic Jewish civilization in dialogue with the world around us. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/act/creative-expression

    Posted on: 2016/12/08 - 1:53pm

  7. Arlene Berger Vayetzey - A Seasonal Hint

    I always think of this time of year as a time of transition. The trees are almost finished shedding their leaves and the air is charged with the smell of winter. We ourselves are transitioning from the vestiges of the High Holiday season of teshuva and gratitude to the modern world’s all too long season of consumption.  
     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/seasonal-hint-jacob-didnt-ask-much-stuff

    Posted on: 2016/12/09 - 10:04am

  8. Spirituality Landing

    Religion is the container for the life of the spirit. It is the gravity that anchors spirit to earth, translating the vision of the soul into the responsibility of the individual. In the best of all possible worlds, spirituality and religion are partners. The soul’s most profound experiences with a presence greater than the self are given form and articulation through liturgy, ritual and moral law. Religious forms, in turn, remain constantly open to the renewal of sacred moments. If spirituality at its best lifts us up, religion at its best keeps us rooted.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/learn/spirituality

    Posted on: 2016/12/09 - 10:21am

  9. Shabbat landing

    There is no more prominent and frequent occurrence in the Jewish calendar than the weekly arrival of Shabbat. Along with the remaining six days of the week, Shabbat provides the basic rhythm of Jewish time. Six days of work, one day of rest: mundane, holy. Hurry up, slow down. Get distracted, return to the Source of All. Worry about yourself and your loved ones, remember your blessings. In the Havdala blessing that marks the end of Shabbat, God is praised for distinguishing between holy and mundane (hamavdil beyn kodesh l’ḥol).

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/shabbat

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 11:42am

  10. High Holidays Landing

    The Hebrew name given to the holidays of Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur is Yamim Nora’im, the Days of Awe. At the heart of our preparations for the Days of Awe is the concept of change and transformation. Jewish tradition understands that human beings are not perfect. We make mistakes that affect others as well as ourselves, but these errors of judgment, omission and commission need not remain with us forever. On Rosh Hashana, we celebrate life and the possibility of new beginnings.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/high-holidays

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 11:47am

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