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  1. Yom Kippur landing

    Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, provides a day of intense self-scrutiny and self-affliction within which to undertake looking inward with the primary goals of atonement, forgiveness, and spiritual cleansing and renewal. The Mishna (Yoma 8.9) teaches that Yom Kippur allows us to atone for transgressions against God, but does not allow us to atone for transgressions against our fellow human beings unless we have first made peace with one another.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/high-holidays/yom-kippur

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 11:55am

  2. Rosh Hashanah Landing

    Rosh HaShana, the Jewish New Year, focuses on God’s judgment and ultimately on a new beginning for humanity: hayom harat olam—the day the world is born anew. The major themes of Rosh HaShana are the creation of the world, the sovereignty of God, divine judgment and remembrance. These themes present an opportunity to identify the creativity that persists every day—the sovereignty of God as the power or energy in the universe that makes for a renewal of humanity, of the world and of community.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/high-holidays/rosh-hashanah

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 11:57am

  3. Simchat Torah and Shemini Atzeret Landing

    Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah mark the end of Sukkot, even though technically they are not part of the Sukkot festival; they are a separate holiday unto themselves. On Shemini Atzeret, we observe the beginning of the rainy season in the Land of Israel with prayers for rain. Reflecting a somber mood, sometimes with melodies reminiscent of the High Holy Days, Shemini Atzeret is a time for lighting Yahrzeit candles for those who have died and commemorating our lost loved ones with a Yizkor service.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/simchat-torah-and-shemini-atzeret

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:07pm

  4. Sukkot Landing

    Five days after the end of Yom Kippur, the festival of Sukkot begins. Sukkot is a weeklong holiday dedicated to bringing worship outside, literally, and it can be understood as our opportunity to face the world anew after the powerful experience of introspection and t’shuva (commitment to change) of the preceding days. One of the three pilgrimage festivals (sh’losh regalim), Sukkot is both a harvest festival and connects us to the time when recently freed Israelites built fragile lives and homes in the wilderness.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/sukkot

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:08pm

  5. Hanukkah Landing

    Hanukkah is a relatively new holiday. It developed in the post-Biblical period, after the successful rebellion in 169-166 BCE against the religious persecutions of King Antiochus IV. The rabbis of the Talmud later wove together extra-biblical stories of the victory with a narrative of miraculous intervention, signified by the miracle of the oil which lasted eight nights rather than one.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/hanukkah

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:14pm

  6. Tu B'Shvat Landing

    Tu B’Shvat takes its name from the date of its observance on the Hebrew calendar—the 15th day of the month of Sh’vat, which falls in January or February. Tu B’Shvat is also known as the New Year for Trees, which is how it is described in the Mishna (Rosh Hashana 1.1) because it is the date from which the age of trees was counted, determining when fruit tithes were owed in the days of the Temple. This date was selected because trees flowered after it. In Israel, where the winters are relatively mild, the date also marks the beginning of the tree-planting season. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/tu-bshvat

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:15pm

  7. Purim Landing

    Purim, falling on the 14th of the Hebrew month of Adar, revolves around the biblical book of Esther and its farcical story of the threatened genocide and eventual salvation of the Jews. The festivities surrounding Purim are the most outlandish and whimsical of the Jewish calendar. Most Jews associate Purim with costumes and carnivals, graggers (noisemakers) and hamantashen (three-cornered, filled cookies that evoke the three-cornered hat of Haman) that appeal to children. But it would be wrong to dismiss Purim as a holiday only for children.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/purim

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:17pm

  8. Omer Counting and Lag BaOmer Aggregate

  9. Yom Hasho'ah Landing

    Yom Hasho’ah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) is the solemn commemoration day that recalls the horrific losses during the Holocaust. The murder of 6 million Jews is the most traumatic event in recent Jewish history. While we should never forget that Jews were not the only targets of Nazi genocide — the Roma people, homosexuals and the Nazi’s political enemies were also singled out — the annihilation suffered by the Jewish people was on an unprecedented scale.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/yom-hashoah

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:21pm

  10. Yom Ha'Atzma'ut and Yom HaZikaron Landing

    Yom HaZikaron, Israeli Memorial Day, for those who have fallen in the defense of the nation, was originally observed only in the State of Israel, but the day has come to be marked in other places as well. In Israel, where there is near-universal military service, the day evokes particularly powerful emotions because almost everyone has had a relative or friend who has died in service to the country. It is observed the day before Israeli Independence Day. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/jewish-time-shabbat-and-holidays/yom-haatzmaut-and-yom-hazikaron

    Posted on: 2016/12/14 - 12:22pm

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