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  1. Melekh Ha-Olem DT Shoftim Eron

    Each time we pronounce a blessing, we are making a political statement. Within the introduction to every blessing are the words which declare that our Eternal God is melekh ha-olam, Sovereign of the Universe. Every time we express our gratitude for the opportunities and experiences life offers us, we also affirm our loyalty to God as our sovereign and acknowledge our citizenship in the Divine One’s dominion. In Hebrew this is called kabbalat ol malchut shamayim, accepting the yoke of the kingdom of heaven. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/melekh-ha-olam-sovereign-all

    Posted on: 2017/08/17 - 11:44am

  2. Addressing Race as a Jewish Community

    Yom Kippur is a time when we confess our wrongdoings collectively, and is therefore an opportune moment in the Jewish calendar to reflect on how we can do teshuvah for the ways in which we have failed, communally and individually, to address the issue of racism.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/sermon/addressing-race-jewish-community

    Posted on: 2017/08/16 - 3:08pm

  3. Be Happy! DT Re'eh Mendelssohn

    “Remember the month of Aviv and keep the Passover…”. In Parashat Re’eh we are given a description of the three major pilgrim festivals, Pesakh, Shavuot, and Sukkot. These are the Ḥagim. “Ḥag” is a cognate of the Arabic word word “Haj”. Just as Haj to Mecca is a requirement for the Muslem (if one can afford it), so is the Ḥag to Jerusalem if one is a Jew. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/be-happy

    Posted on: 2017/08/11 - 2:39pm

  4. Open Your Hand DT Re'eh Kligler

    Pato’ach tiftach et yadcha l’achicha, l’aniyecha u’le’evyoncha b’artzecha

    כִּ֛י לֹא־יֶחְדַּ֥ל אֶבְי֖וֹן מִקֶּ֣רֶב הָאָ֑רֶץ עַל־כֵּ֞ן אָנֹכִ֤י מְצַוְּךָ֙ לֵאמֹ֔ר פָּ֠תֹחַ תִּפְתַּ֨ח אֶת־יָדְךָ֜ לְאָחִ֧יךָ לַעֲנִיֶּ֛ךָ וּלְאֶבְיֹנְךָ֖ בְּאַרְצֶֽךָ׃

    You must open, open your hand to the poor and to the needy in your land. (Deuteronomy 15:11)

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/open-your-hand

    Posted on: 2017/08/11 - 2:24pm

  5. By Bread Alone? Ekev DT SCR

    Sometimes all of life seems like a test. Friendships drift away, loved ones die, we find ourselves fighting a serious illness or falling victim to corporate “downsizing” and either having our salaries cut or losing our jobs altogether. It’s remarkable how quickly even the most positive of people can suddenly find themselves haunted by questions of “Why me?” as their lives seem to undergo one blow after another. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/bread-alone

    Posted on: 2017/08/03 - 12:07pm

  6. Shabbat Naḥamu - DT Va'et'khanan Richard Hirsh

    The summer cycle of scriptural readings revolves around two sets of text. The first is the weekly cycle of readings which progresses through the final book of the Torah, Deuteronomy. The second is the ten week cycle of haftarot, or supplementary readings, selected from the writings found in the books of Isaiah and Jeremiah, which orbit around the fast day of Tisha B’Av.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/shabbat-nahamu

    Posted on: 2017/07/28 - 10:41am

  7. Our Sustaining Hope - - Eron DT Va'et'khanan Nachamu

    The great miracle of Jewish survival is not that we survived great tragedies. It is that we survived as a community ever faithful to its vision of a better world for us and for all people and not as an angry and embittered tribe. 

    When we look at Jewish responses to the tragedies of our past, what emerges is that despite the great disasters, the unbelievable suffering, the unbearable pain, and the overwhelming sense of loss, we never believed that our God abandoned us. We never gave up hope. 

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/our-sustaining-hope

    Posted on: 2017/07/28 - 10:32am

  8. It Reached No Further DT Va'et'khanan Howard Cohen

    This week, we listen in as Moshe continues his farewell address to the Israelites. His focus shifts to what the people must remember and honor as their foundational principles: namely, the numerous laws, edicts and assorted teachings. In particular, Moshe emphasizes the Aseret HaDibrot, the Ten Commandments, and thus they are repeated here. These can safely be described as the quintessential universal biblical teaching, since they are readily embraced by all religions with their taproot in the Hebrew Bible.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/it-reached-no-further

    Posted on: 2017/07/28 - 10:26am

  9. Pinkhas DT David Steinberg

    Since I’m the only rabbi in the Duluth area, I regularly get called on by the local hospitals to visit patients who indicate on their admission forms that they are Jewish. Sometimes I’m visiting members of my own congregation. Sometimes I’m visiting unaffiliated Jews who might live in the area, or who might be simply passing through. Recently I had the occasion of visiting someone who was very elderly and immediately thereafter visiting a mother of a newborn baby.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/next-generation

    Posted on: 2017/07/20 - 10:51am

  10. Finding Your Voice DT Devarim Kligler

    B’ever ha’Yarden b’eretz Moav ho’il Moshe be’er et hatorah hazot

    בְּעֵ֥בֶר הַיַּרְדֵּ֖ן בְּאֶ֣רֶץ מוֹאָ֑ב הוֹאִ֣יל מֹשֶׁ֔ה בֵּאֵ֛ר אֶת־הַתּוֹרָ֥ה הַזֹּ֖את

    On the far side of the Jordan, in the land of Moab, Moses undertook to explain this Torah (Deuteronomy 1:5)

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/dvar-torah/finding-your-voice

    Posted on: 2017/07/21 - 6:37pm

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