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  1. Adonai-Elohim: The Two Faces of God

    Right after Yom Kippur I received a frantic telephone call. As I arrived at the home, it was already filled with family and friends. I knew the family very well: serious Jews.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/adonai-elohim-two-faces-god

    Posted on: 2016/04/26 - 11:46am

  2. What's God Have to Do With It?

    A High Holiday Sermon delivered by by Rabbi Sid Schwarz at Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation, Bethesda, MD
    Yom Kippur 2007

    Some of you will remember the old Art Linkletter show. His signature piece on the show was his interviews with children which he later compiled in a book called Kids Say the Darndest Things. I thought of this when I recently picked up a book entitled, Children’s Letters to God. Here are a few excerpts:

    “Dear God:

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/sermon/whats-god-have-do-it

    Posted on: 2016/05/06 - 10:32am

  3. Can a Reconstructionist Sin?

    Some years ago, at an informal lunch shared by a number of us who worked for the same Jewish agency, a staffer indicated she had no need to attend Yom Kippur services. Predictably provoked, we asked why. Yom Kippur was all about sin, she replied, and since she never sinned, she had nothing for which to atone.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/can-reconstructionist-sin

    Posted on: 2016/05/06 - 11:06am

  4. Reconstructionism, Chosenness, and the Abrahamic Dialogue

    The first time I encountered the idea that Jews were a “chosen people,” I learned that this was a mistaken and even pernicious belief that was held by other Jews. The rejection of chosenness made sense to me then as a 12 year old preparing for her bat mitzvah in a Reconstructionist congregation. It has continued to make sense to me over the years, for all the reasons that Rabbi Deborah Waxman so eloquently lays out in her article, “Rejecting Chosenness in Favor of Distinctiveness.”

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/reconstructionism-chosenness-and-abrahamic-dialogue

    Posted on: 2016/05/13 - 11:44am

  5. Rejecting Chosenness in Favor of Distinctiveness

    In what sense and to what extent do Jews still believe ourselves to be “chosen”?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/rejecting-chosenness-favor-distinctiveness

    Posted on: 2016/05/13 - 11:48am

  6. Building a Personal Relationship with a Nonpersonal God

    They envisioned you in an abundance of metaphors.
    You are one in all of those images.

    –Shir Hakavod (12th-century Germany)1

     

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/building-personal-relationship-nonpersonal-god

    Posted on: 2016/05/13 - 12:43pm

  7. Recon Torah January 2016

    In the New York Times Sunday Styles section a few weeks ago (of all places, and yes, I read it), there was an article about the various trainings that colleges and universities are now providing to educate students about sexual consent. Many of these trainings include scenarios and analogies that are designed to get students thinking about what “real” consent is. The scenarios raise questions like: Does consent have to be verbal? Do the participants need to consent at each step of the way? What counts as coercion?

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/intricacies-consent

    Posted on: 2016/01/28 - 12:00am

  8. God in Metaphor

    For many people, attending High Holydays services is a bit like going to a play where you really don't like the main character—where, much of the time, you doubt the very existence of the main character! If the “main character” in our traditional High Holydays liturgy is God, this can be quite a problem for anyone seeking a meaningful spiritual experience.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/article/god-metaphor-guide-perplexed

    Posted on: 2016/11/17 - 3:25pm

  9. Why We Need Process Theology

    What is “process theology”? Rabbi Toba Spitzer argues that it offers ways to think and talk about God that make sense in a modern scientific framework, that resonate with Jewish texts and traditions, and that promote wise and ethical behavior. 

    This article originally appeared in CCAR Journal: The Reform Jewish Quarterly, Winter 2012. Copyright by Central Conference of American Rabbis. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/document/why-we-need-process-theology

    Posted on: 2016/11/18 - 8:21am

  10. Fred Dobb Eco-Judaism session - Global Day 2016

    “Love of the Creator, and love of that which G!d has created, are finally one and the same,” wrote Martin Buber.  Defending this divine creation in an era of climate change is a Jewish (and social, political, and moral) imperative.  A rich Jewish life is by nature an environmental one, though we need to pick up the pace, draw more explicit connections, and make our community a beacon of sustainability.

    https://archive.reconstructingjudaism.org/video/eco-judaism-there-any-other-kind-how-torah-pushes-sustainability-envelope

    Posted on: 2016/11/21 - 1:20am

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